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Breast Reconstruction Procedures

Breast reconstruction surgery is a personal journey, an intimate struggle that can mean regaining your selfhood and your identity. East Coast Advanced Plastic Surgery offers the latest techniques and innovations developed to honor where you have come from and keep the promise of where you are going. When it comes to your breast reconstruction surgery, you can rely on our experience and our expertise to help you on your journey.

Tissue Expander Reconstruction

Sometimes performed during the initial mastectomy, tissue expander procedures insert a small device into the muscle tissue of the chest. This device is essentially a balloon with a strategically located valve that allows surgeons to inject a saline solution into the expander. By slowly expanding the size of the device over the following weeks and months, a pocket can be created for the final breast implant with minimal discomfort.

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DIEP Flap Procedure

The possibilities and techniques for breast reconstruction following a mastectomy have expanded tremendously. And the DIEP flap procedure (Deep Inferior Epigastric artery Perforator Flap) is one of the most sophisticated breast reconstruction procedures performed today.

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SGAP Flap Procedure

During your SGAP procedure, your plastic surgeon will make an incision on your upper buttock area, just beneath your back, and generally in an area that will be hidden by your underwear. Tissue—including muscle tissue and blood vessels—will be removed from your upper buttock area and implanted into your chest area, usually into the pocket formed by a tissue expander.

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IGAP Flap Procedure

As with many breast reconstruction procedures that use donor material, IGAP flaps are differentiated by the location of the donor tissue. In this case, the donor tissue comes from the lower buttock area. In this regard, IGAP flap procedures are very similar to SGAP flap procedures, which take donor material from the top of the buttock area. In the end, the decision to pursue an IGAP or an SGAP flap procedure may stem from whether the upper or lower buttocks have more viable donor tissue.

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TUG Flap Procedure

The donor in a TUG Flap comes from the inner thigh—it’s a small muscle, used in normal function to help close the legs inward. It’s important to note that most patients do not experience any loss of strength in the legs, despite the removal of this muscle, which is one reason why TUG flap procedures are appealing for some women. However, because the donor muscle is a relatively small muscle, TUG flaps are only able to provide a modest amount of volume to the reconstructed breast.

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LD Flap Procedure

The muscle used for this procedure, located in the back, is generally responsible for lifting and twisting motions, so some women who have undergone LD Flap procedures do notice a slight decrease in the strength of those motions. However, due to the modest size of the donor area, LD Flap procedures may be best for women who are looking for a small or medium-sized breast.

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TRAM Flap Procedure

The TRAM flap procedure (Transverse Rectus Abdominus Myocutaneous) is a sophisticated type of breast reconstructive surgery. There are two types of TRAM flap procedures, both of which use skin and fatty issue from the abdominal region to create a natural looking breast.

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Nipple Reconstruction

Nipple reconstruction is often intended for women who have lost one or both nipples to a mastectomy or lumpectomy, and may be performed at the time of breast reconstruction, or as a follow-up procedure. Nipple reconstruction has also been used to benefit post-burn victims.

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Vascular Lymph Node Transfer

Vascular lymph node transfer is a surgery to help cure lymphedema, a condition that can be caused by different treatments for breast cancer, namely axillary node dissections (removing lymph nodes from the armpit that may be cancerous) and radiation therapy (sometimes used to kill cancer cells in the armpit.)

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